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COMING SOON: Land, People and Power in Early Medieval Wales

The cantref of Cemais in comparative perspective

£72.00
Author:
Rhiannon Comeau
Publication Year:
2020
Language:
English
Paperback:
341 pages, With additional material online
ISBN:
9781407357126
Sub-series name:
UCL Institute of Archaeology PhD Series, 5
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Description

This is a study of the seasonal activity cycles of a pre-urban society, examined through the lens of an early medieval Welsh case study. It considers the patterns of power and habitual activity that defined spaces and structured lives. Key areas of early medieval life - agriculture, tribute-payment, legal processes and hunting - are shown to share a longstanding seasonal patterning that is preserved in medieval Welsh law, church and well dedications, and fair dates. Focussing on a cantref (‘hundred’) land unit in south west Wales, it uses an innovative GIS-based multidisciplinary, comparative analysis to circumnavigate a restricted archaeological record and limited written sources. The study presents the first systematic survey of assembly site evidence in Wales, and reassesses widely-used interpretative models of the early medieval landscape. Digital resources include databases of geolocated pre-1700 place-names and of 16th-century demesne and Welsh-law landholdings.

AUTHOR
Rhiannon Comeau completed her AHRC-funded PhD at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL in 2019. She specialises in the landscape archaeology of early medieval Wales, having published previously on its agricultural systems and focal places. A latecomer, via Continuing Education, to archaeology, she is a Trustee of the Cambrian Archaeological Association.

REVIEW
‘Rhiannon Comeau has drawn together a remarkably wide variety of information including landscape, archaeology, place names and written sources to throw light on the medieval period of this region of western Wales. In doing so, she has shown how to investigate rural areas where individual sources are lacking. This is a truly multidisciplinary and excellently readable book and is highly recommended.’ Dr Kris Lockyear, UCL