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International Archaeological Reports since 1974

COMING SOON: Conservation Practices at Foreign-run Archaeological Excavations in Turkey

A critical review

£52.00
Author:
B. Nilgün Öz
Publication Year:
2019
Language:
English
Paperback:
222 pages, Illustrated throughout in colour and black and white. 8 tables, 107 figures.
ISBN:
9781407356587
Product not yet available. To be informed when this item is available for purchase please send an email to info@barpublishing.com

Description

Foreign-run excavations are a significant component of archaeological research in Turkey, however, conservation work carried out at these excavations has never been examined holistically. B. Nilgün Öz investigates archaeological conservation at foreign-run excavations at 19 sites across Turkey to identify the scale and nature of differing contributions, determining changing approaches and issues impacting conservation practices, as well as possible catalysts, influences and driving forces. Through a systematic appraisal of the variety of conservation work between 1979 and 2014, this research contributes to a wider understanding of the dynamics of archaeological heritage management and archaeological conservation as it is practiced in Turkey at foreign-run projects. This thought-provoking and timely book will be a valuable resource to students and scholars of archaeology, architecture, conservation, heritage and history.

AUTHOR
B. Nilgün Öz is a conservation architect (Middle East Technical University-METU BArch 1998, METU MSc 2002, METU PhD 2018). She has held fellowships at the University of Liverpool and Koç University in Istanbul. She is an expert member of ICOMOS-Turkey.

REVIEW
‘The publication, the information it contains and the discussions it engages in will be of significant value to researchers and practitioners in the field, not only those working in Turkey but also in many other parts of the Mediterranean and the Middle East.’ Dr Aylin Orbasli, Oxford Brookes University