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International Archaeological Reports since 1974

Architectural Terracottas at the Sanctuary of Punta Stilo at Kaulonia

Genesis, Problems, Developments

£33.00
Author:
Nicola Giaccone
Publication Year:
2015
Language:
English
Paperback:
144pp. Includes 1 table, plate section comprises 165 black and white photographs, 17 pages of drawings
ISBN:
9781407314563
BAR number:
S2777
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Description

This monograph focuses on Greek architectural terracottas coming from recent excavations at the urban sanctuary of Kaulonia, a polis on the eastern coast of Calabria. The work outlines the phenomenon of architectural terracottas in their diachronic development, clarifying the manner in which their production first arose, reconstructing the range of distribution of the products of Kaulonia (among the most important in Magna Graecia), and highlighting their links with other materials of the same class in Greece and Southern Italy. It also examines significant aspects of production and attempts to investigate the ideological elements implicit in 'horn' roofs (a peculiar group of Southern Italy terracottas). The monograph further presents results that are of interest to wider architectural studies and Greek archaeology, including a reappraisal of 'horn' roofs class and a new identification of roofs found at Olympia.

AUTHOR
Nicola Giaccone studied Classics at the University of Pisa, where he obtained an MA and a PhD in Archaeology. He has taken part in many excavations in Friuli Venezia Giulia, Calabria and Sicily. His interests are on Greek architecture and Greek archaeology, especially the archaeology of the Greeks in Southern Italy. He has studied architectural elements of Greek temples and sanctuary buildings, ancient building techniques and the archaeology of religion in Greek sanctuaries. He has authored several papers on archaeological contexts of Sicily and Calabria, as well as on Greek architectural terracottas.